Mastiff/Rottweiler mix?

I will be adopting a male Mastiff/Rottweiler mix pup from a rescue group soon. He is currently about 13-14 weeks and about 25-28 lbs. His foster says he's playful, outgoing, and a bit of a velcro dog (needs a lot of attention), all of which is fine by me! Just wondering if anyone else has a similar mix, and their experiences with it? Also, although no one can know for sure, about how big would you guess he'd end up? His mom was the Rottie, dad was an English Mastiff that jumped the fence.

Thanks!

CONGRATULATIONS!
*It is wonderful to hear about someone adopting from the growing number of dogs (& cats) needing rescuing. Good for you!!!
*If you'd like a technical description of your future dog here it is: BIG, REALLY BIG!!! ; )
*Seriously, "if" he takes after the female (mother) then the dog could weigh much less than if it takes after the male (father). If he's 25 lbs. at the age of 3.5 months I would say the dog could possibly double this weight by 6 months.
*ONE of the fun things about a dog like yours is the surprise when it gets to be a "teenager" and grows into his (full potential) = "finished product".
*The very best advice anyone can give a new dog owner is: sign up for beginner's training/obedience class/ school!!!
* With BIG DOGS is is vital to become the "leader" immediately. Obedience training can literally save their life.
Make sure YOU are the one doing the training, (& you'll be trained at the same time).
*If you do this you will avoid the possible "negative" things about large dogs. He will NOT jump on people, will not PULL you or others so that you fall on your face, dislocate your arm/shoulder or get hit by a car. You will be the pack leader who decides what, when and how you and your dog will enjoy life.
*A big dog 's "sit", "stay", "down" ON and OFF lead will make you AND the dog: safe, happy and POPULAR with others.
*Both breeds are highly intelligent! In order for them NOT to become bored, depressed or develop bad habits…Training is key. He will learn to respect other dogs and people, too.

*Have you seen the obedience trials on TV? When they're "working" they are always smiling! (and the owners, too)!

*Don't forget the REWARDS… you give them (pats, scratches, hugs & treats) and you get them back 10 fold!!!

Wishing you great success now and in the future!

  • dukefenton

    You could very easily end up with a dog in the 100-120 pound range. You can't say 'mastiff' without 'mass!' So long as he continues being a sweetie, no problem. But if he starts getting stubborn or possessive, you could have a real problem on your hands. Mastiffs, tend to be easy going, but some Rotties are very hard-headed. Early and consistent training is a must.
    References :

  • Mandy aka Dane-A-Holic

    I'd say probably around 100 lbs. My neighbors have a mastiff whom I absolutely adore. He is the sweetest goofiest thing. Mastiffs are generally pretty laid back but protective, where as rotties are very protective, make sure you socialize that puppy asap so he's friendly with other dogs,strangers, cats and kiddos.
    References :

  • remi21

    i would guess anywhere from 120-145 lbs based on the rotties and mastiffs i have known
    References :

  • Periwinkle

    At 4 months you take the weight and double it. That will be the weight of the adult healthy (not overweight) dog. He is almost at that age now so I don't think he will be all that big. My Rottie/lab mix is 80 lbs.
    This info is from the genetics dept of a well known veterinary school.
    References :

  • sweetboniie

    Mastiffs are usually big softies but rottweilers can be a bit possesive which can cause problems and make them aggressive.I think training and socialising well would be good.
    References :

  • banche

    Your going to have a big one on your hands! No less than a 100 lbs is my guess. My vet owns a mastiff..she lets him hang around the office all the time. He's a sweetheart with a good temperament. I'm not sure about the breeds together..but I did have 3 neighbors in my neighborhood that all had Rotts. They were very protective and extremely smart.
    References :

  • lilcslilhottie

    that breed is called English Mastweiler. males are more larger then females!! u will have a big dog i will say that! he might end up as big as his dad which they can weigh 160-200 lbs which he might have the rottweiler markings and he might be as big as a english mastiff! They are both great watch dog breeds!
    i have a pure bred rottweiler and she weighs 116 and she is the best thing ever! they are a one person dog the weigh from 90-165 depends on the bred if its american or german rottweiler!

    mastiff
    The Old English Mastiff is one of the heaviest breeds; a male Mastiff can exceed 200 pounds. This dog is very massive, powerful and muscular. The head is heavy and square with a short muzzle. There is a black mask around the eyes and nose no matter what the general coat color. The eyes are small, dark, and hazel. The small ears should also be dark-colored. The teeth should meet in a scissors or slightly undershot bite. The tail is set quite high, tapers to the tip, and reaches to the hocks. The short coat comes in golden fawn, light fawn, brindle, silver, tiger, and apricot and is easy to groom. In the eighteenth century it was described as follows:

    "As a lion is to a cat, so is a mastiff compared to a dog."

    Temperament
    Originally valued for their abilities as a fierce guard and fighting dog, today's Mastiff is a gentle giant. It is a self-confident, watchful, and patient dog who is gentle-natured towards his family. Intelligent and dignified. It rarely barks, but it is in its nature to defend its territory and family. Calm, steady and docile, this dog is normally excellent with children, (not recommend for toddlers though, because of their great size). Good natured, but very large and heavy. Responds well to gentle, patient training. This breed loves to please and needs lots of companionship. The Mastiff's dominance varies widely depending on the lineage. They can be aloof with strangers or fairly friendly. Do not hit a Mastiff or you are asking for it! A born guard dog, brave and loyal. When strangers visit, it is likely to refuse to let them in unless they are accepted by its handler. The Mastiff generally holds intruders at bay rather than attacking. Protection training is unnecessary for this naturally protective breed. It is very possessive of home, family and car. It may be combative with other dogs if not very well socialized as a puppy, so extra effort should be given to socialize a Mastiff puppy. If properly socialized it will get along well with other dogs. The Mastiff tends to drool, wheeze and snore loudly. They can be somewhat difficult to train.

    Height, Weight
    Height: males from 30 inches
    femalefrom 27 inches
    Weight: males about 160 pounds
    Female about 150 pounds

    Health Problems
    Beware of hip dysplasia. As these dogs are prone to bloat, feed two or three small meals a day, instead of one large one. Also prone to CHD, gastric torsion, ectropion, PPM, vaginal hyperplasia, elbow dysplasia and PRA. Occasionally seen is cardiomyopathy.

    Living Conditions
    The Mastiff will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do.

    Exercise
    Mastiffs are inclined to be lazy but they will keep fitter and happier if given regular exercise. Like all dogs, the American Mastiff should be taken on daily regular walks to help release it's mental and physical energy. It's in a dogs nature to walk. They should always be leashed in public.

    Life Expectancy
    About 10-12 years.

    Grooming
    The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Brush with a firm bristle brush and wipe over with a piece of toweling or chamois for a gleaming finish. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    Found in Britain as early as the Roman invasion, the Noble Old English Mastiff was probably brought to that island by Phoenician traders as early as the 6th century BC. Since then, the Mastiff has been used as an arena gladiator by the Romans, in the bloody sport of bull, bear and dog combat, and as a sheep guardian, bodyguard, protector, and companion. A Mastiff came to America on the Mayflower and subsequently other dogs were imported. By the end of World War II, Mastiffs were almost extinct in England. However, with fresh imports from the United States and Canada, the breed is once again well established in today's England. Some of the Mastiff's talents include: watchdogging, guarding, police work, military work, search & rescue, and weight pulling.

    Rottweilers
    The Rottweiler has a massive, powerful body. Muscular and athletic, it has a broad head and rounded forehead. The muzzle is well-developed with a scissors bite. Its eyes are dark with an expression of goodwill and loyalty. The ears are triangular, carried forward, and its nose is wide and black. The lips are black and inside the mouth it is dark-colored. The tail is customarily docked. Often born with rear dewclaws, these are usually removed when the tail is docked. The coat is short, hard and thick. It is black with brown markings on the cheeks and muzzle, paws and legs. A red color with brown markings also exists. There is a deficiency in the hair gene making the coloring a lighter red. Rottweiler bitches often have large litters; 12 puppies are not uncommon.

    German Rottweiler vs. American Rottweiler – some claim there are variations of Rotties, the German Rottweiler and the American Rottweiler. German Rotties are said to be shorter, stockier and have a bigger blockier head, and American Rotties are said to be taller and leggier without as blocky a head. Others claim a Rottweiler is a Rottweiler and there is no such thing as a German Rottie. Some who have stated this argument have said, "a German Rottweiler is one born in Germany and an American Rottweiler is born in America." In any case, there are breeders breeding for the German Rottweiler look, which goes outside the AKC standard, while others are breeding for the American Rottweiler look, sticking to, or closer to, the AKC standard.

    Temperament
    The Rottie is calm, trainable, courageous, and devoted to their owner and family. They have a reliable temperament. Protective, he will defend his family fiercely. These are strong fighters that seem immune to pain. Serious, steady and confident. Firm and careful training is essential for this breed, otherwise you may end up with a very powerful and overly aggressive dog. Yet they can, with proper handling, also be loyal, loving and very rewarding companions. They require owners who can handle their massive size. The Rottie is a natural guard dog with a mellow temperament. They are highly intelligent and have proven their worth beyond question in police, military, and customs work over many centuries. Because of their size, training should begin fairly young – while the dog is still small, and great care should be taken to ensure that the dog is not made vicious. This breed needs a lot of companionship and socialization to be truly happy. They can be aggressive with other dogs and should be kept on leashes in public places. When the Rottweiler is consistently brought up and trained, it will be a good playmate for the children. It will accept cats and other household pets as long as the dog has had a positive experience with them while it was young. Friends and relatives of the family are normally enthusiastically welcomed. Strangers can get no further than the sidewalk. The breed does well in competitive obedience, schutzhund, and tracking.

    Height, Weight
    Height: males24-27 inches
    females 22-25 inches
    Weight: males 95-130 pounds
    females 85-115 pounds

    Health Problems
    This breed is susceptible to ACL damage. Prone to hip dysplasia. Tends to snore and overeat. Also prone to entropion (narrowing of the slit between the eyelids).

    Living Conditions
    The Rottie will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

    Exercise
    The Roman Rottweiler needs plenty of exercise. You can't give these robust dogs too much work or exercise; they thrive on it. They need to be taken on a daily walk or jog. Running in the woods and in open country makes them very happy and they have no desire to wander from you. Swimming or running beside a bicycle are perfect activities for this dog and it also loves retrieving a ball.

    Life Expectancy
    About 10-12 years.
    Grooming
    The smooth, glossy coat is easy to groom. Brush with a firm bristle brush and bathe only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

    Origin
    The Rottweiler is probably descended from the Italian Mastiff. During the Middle Ages, it was used as a herd dog. It was bred in the German town of Rottweil in Wurttemberg. Practically extinct in the 1800's, the breed population began a comeback in the early twentieth century due to the efforts of enthusiastic breeders centered in Stuttgart. Some of the Rottweilers talents include: tracking, herding, watchdogging, guarding, police work, carting, competitive obedience, and schutzhund.
    References :
    rottweiler owner for 24 yrs

  • Carol W

    I think your pup is gonna be huge. A male rottie weighs in around 90 – 120 lbs. A mastiff can easily weigh around 200. They look like horses!!! They say that the rottweiler is a descendent of the mastiff. Both were orginally bred to be drovers. They are herding dogs and love to work. Be sure you exercise your pup a lot and know that this is not an outside dog but a family dog. He'll thrive on love and attention. Please be sure he gets the proper veterniary care that this big of a dog need. They are prone to bloat, hip and elbow dysplasia, parvo, arthritis and heart problems. Be sure to ask your vet about an extra parvo shot because of the b breed.
    Good luck with your little baby and have fun!
    References :
    Rottweiler breeder

  • PEACE ON EARTH

    CONGRATULATIONS!
    *It is wonderful to hear about someone adopting from the growing number of dogs (& cats) needing rescuing. Good for you!!!
    *If you'd like a technical description of your future dog here it is: BIG, REALLY BIG!!! ; )
    *Seriously, "if" he takes after the female (mother) then the dog could weigh much less than if it takes after the male (father). If he's 25 lbs. at the age of 3.5 months I would say the dog could possibly double this weight by 6 months.
    *ONE of the fun things about a dog like yours is the surprise when it gets to be a "teenager" and grows into his (full potential) = "finished product".
    *The very best advice anyone can give a new dog owner is: sign up for beginner's training/obedience class/ school!!!
    * With BIG DOGS is is vital to become the "leader" immediately. Obedience training can literally save their life.
    Make sure YOU are the one doing the training, (& you'll be trained at the same time).
    *If you do this you will avoid the possible "negative" things about large dogs. He will NOT jump on people, will not PULL you or others so that you fall on your face, dislocate your arm/shoulder or get hit by a car. You will be the pack leader who decides what, when and how you and your dog will enjoy life.
    *A big dog 's "sit", "stay", "down" ON and OFF lead will make you AND the dog: safe, happy and POPULAR with others.
    *Both breeds are highly intelligent! In order for them NOT to become bored, depressed or develop bad habits…Training is key. He will learn to respect other dogs and people, too.

    *Have you seen the obedience trials on TV? When they're "working" they are always smiling! (and the owners, too)!

    *Don't forget the REWARDS… you give them (pats, scratches, hugs & treats) and you get them back 10 fold!!!

    Wishing you great success now and in the future!
    References :
    Retired Breeder, show handler, trainer and animal advocate.

  • dravenmakes3

    We have a 3 year old mastiff / rottie mix. I love him he is a great dog. He gets along with my 2 year old he can crawl all over him and he dont care. He is about 175 lbs, hes mom was the rottie and dad english mastiff. Sorry his name is Odin, he is a therpy dog he does great in a larg groups. When we first got him at 6 weeks old. We toke him ever were with us and that made a huge differnts. His tall is cropped and im happy about that things would be broken. I could send some pics if you wont.
    References :

The Rottweiler Manual